COVID-19 in the United States:
State-level Restrictions and Supply Chain Impacts

COVID-19 in the United States:
State-level Restrictions and Supply Chain Impacts

Executive Summary

  • The United States has recorded more than 50,000 new coronavirus cases in recent days, largely across southern and western states which had avoided a large outbreak in March and April when the northeastern part of the country was badly impacted. The current resurgence of cases is due, in large part, to early reopening of economic and recreational activity in these regions.
  • Texas, Florida, and Arizona, three of the states with the fastest-growing number of COVID-19 cases, are reversing reopening measures in certain counties with significant community spread. Over the two past weeks, the combined total number of new cases reported in Texas and Florida was greater than the combined total reported in all 27 European Union countries. Arizona now has the highest positivity rate in the U.S., at 24 percent, compared to the national average of 8.5 percent.
  • Northeast states such as New York and New Jersey are seeing relative success in balancing the resumption of economic activity with virus containment measures. All manufacturing and logistics activities are now operating at full operational capacity – making the region one of the least economically interrupted by the virus at this time. 
  • California, with one of the most strictly enforced statewide virus containment measures, continues to report new daily records of positive cases. Given its strategic coastal positioning, many critical ports such as Oakland continue to experience maritime cargo disruptions from decreased port capacity and diminished inbound shipping traffic.
  • The U.S. southern border with Mexico remains closed to non-essential business. Though ground freight cargo, and commerce and trade more generally, are exempt from the border closure, enhanced sanitation and health measures are causing considerable delays and disruptions. New Mexico, the southwestern U.S. state which exports USD 1.5 billion to Mexico annually, is most impacted by the disruptions.
  • The recent spike in COVID-19 cases in the southern and western states jeopardizes national progress and economic recovery. While states aim for the safest reopening and continuation of business operations, the inevitable uptick in cases risks prolonging the pandemic and further disrupting supply chain operations. COVID-19 has a localized epidemiological nature which requires a wide variety of regulatory approaches by state governments. Supply chain managers with manufacturing or transportation operations in the United States must adapt to state-level outbreak containment measures.

Introduction

The COVID-19 pandemic continues to inflict unprecedented damage on economies around the world. The U.S., now the virus epicenter, is experiencing widespread disruption as a result of containment measures. Efforts to curb the rampant spread of the virus were delegated to state governments. With a few exceptions, the initial reaction was to halt all economic activity and implement stay-at-home mandates beginning the second week of March. The three subsequent months saw declining economic productivity and, consequentially, disruptions to supply chain operations reliant on normal operating capacity. Cargo logistics and manufacturing were largely exempt from statewide business restrictions. Yet, the COVID-19 pandemic has inflicted operational disruptions that have had reverberating effects on global supply chains. An emphasis on limiting in-person interaction to curb the spread of the virus has led to an uptick in worker absences at factories, seaports, and airports, disrupting production and transport timelines. The U.S. land border with both Canada and Mexico have been closed in an abundance of caution. Though not applicable to cargo transport, enhanced screening measures have caused congestion. Virus outbreaks in close working quarters in factories across the U.S. have halted production entirely. An overreliance on impacted countries, such as China, have also highlighted the supply chain risks of single sourcing for many U.S. companies. These realities prompted state governors to consider the speed at which normalization efforts could safely occur. The onset of June prompted a pivotal point at which states either extended containment efforts through the summer, or elected to begin a transitionary, phased method of reopening.  

Some state governors determined that economic and manufacturing setbacks called for a faster reopening. In these states, most non-essential businesses were permitted to resume operations, albeit at reduced capacity. Unfortunately, an increase in new confirmed cases ensued in many of the states which opted for an early reopening. Despite undertaking the reopening in phases, the virus spread across communities in southern states like Texas and Florida, which had also delayed implementing lockdown measures in March. In contrast, northeastern states like New York and New Jersey had initially been badly impacted by the virus in March and April. Strict and sustained lockdown measures have helped them to reverse course and stabilize the health situation, though at the expense of economic revival. 

There now exists a widespread determination that an uptick in new cases correlates with easing of restrictions. To prevent a second wave of an outbreak, many states are discontinuing or even reversing phased reopening efforts. However, economic pressures are intensifying, prompting most states to permit reopening in compliance with safety guidelines established by the U.S. Center for Disease Control (CDC) and the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). 

This Everstream Analytics report examines the extent of the outbreak and the associated containment measures on a U.S. regional basis and analyzes the resulting supply chain impacts. It also recommends measures that supply chain managers can take to minimize and mitigate risk.

Southern United States

Southern U.S. states had largely avoided the severity of the COVID-19 outbreak that hit the northeastern part of the country in March and April. All 17 southern U.S. states have begun to reopen to some extent after being locked down since early March. However, a growing number of states are pausing or reversing course after seeing a new surge of COVID-19 cases. Texas and Florida are reversing reopening measures in certain counties. Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Delaware have each reopened some sectors of the economy but have paused or delayed plans to reopen others after experiencing an increase in positive cases. States which are in the process of fully or partially reopening include Georgia, Tennessee, Virginia, West Virginia, and Maryland. Oklahoma and Kentucky have opened every major sector, but with restrictions such as decreased occupancy, mask requirements, and enforced social distancing.

Florida and Texas have emerged as the latest hot spots in the entire country, both of which are now reporting record daily increases in confirmed COVID-19 cases. Over the past two weeks, the combined total number of new cases reported in Texas and Florida was greater than the combined total reported in all 27 European Union countries. Florida alone confirmed 11,458 coronavirus cases on July 4, triggering a caseload increase of over 10,000 within 24 hours. In Texas, the number of new cases rose by 8,258 on July 4. North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Alabama each registered new daily record numbers on July 3.[ The surge in cases in southern states comes after businesses had been permitted to reopen in the preceding weeks. Resurgence of cases in Texas and Florida has led state and county officials to establish tightened business restrictions once again; in late June, Texas, Florida, and Arizona paused reopening plans to control the outbreak. On June 26, Florida Governor Ron DeSantis imposed new restrictions, ordering bars in the state to stop serving alcohol on their premises. On the following day, the mayor of Galena Park, Texas, imposed an overnight curfew and warned that hospitals could soon become overwhelmed. Although COVID-19 cases continue to surge in the south, manufacturing and logistics activities have been deemed essential by state governments and are operating close to normally. 

More information about reopening measures in these states can be found in Appendix A. 

Northeastern United States

As a severe and early outbreak occurred in New York in March and April, other densely populated states in the region proactively adopted some of the most restrictive and enduring measures against the spread of COVID-19. Initially, these measures extended to commercial activity, impacting manufacturing in New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania in particular. 

At the present time, states in the northeast are focused on simultaneously maintaining low case counts and low impediments to business activity. This has contributed to it now being the lowest-risk region in the country for COVID-19 interruptions. As of July 2020, manufacturing and logistics activities which were disrupted have been almost universally permitted to resume, while measures affecting public activity in order to limit the spread of the virus remain stricter than in other regions of the country. Approximately half of the states in the region, including the tri-state area of New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut, have implemented aggressive quarantine policies on arrivals from other states. However, these regulations largely do not apply to logistics operators. There are no current indications of an imminent second wave returning to the region, although the circumstances remain dynamic and subject to change. 

To see more details about the easing of restrictions in these states, please see Appendix B.

Western United States

The western part of the U.S. was relatively untouched by COVID-19 in the early days of the pandemic. Yet, it is now home to some of the country’s most rapidly intensifying hot spots. A new wave of infections continues to sweep across the country’s southern and western regions. Arizona, for instance, now has the highest rate of positive cases in the U.S. The World Health Organization (WHO) suggests that areas with widespread access to testing maintain a positivity rate below 5 percent. Trends indicate that Arizona’s virus metrics have been moving in the wrong direction over the last month, with an average of 24 percent of tests showing positive results. California continues to set daily records for new confirmations of positive COVID-19 cases and is preparing for another surge in related hospitalizations. Its positivity rate has recently risen to 7.3 percent. In comparison, the early virus epicenter of New York now has a 1.1 percent positivity rate, and the nationwide average is 8.5 percent. 9 of the 12 western states indicated here are testing positive at rates above 5 percent. 

Manufacturing and logistics operations are deemed essential throughout the western U.S. Despite this, supply chain operations dependent on stability in the western U.S. are at risk due to rising infections of COVID-19. Worsening outbreaks in manufacturing hubs like Arizona risk straining its USD 30 billion manufacturing output. In California, COVID-19 has led to drastic declines in shipping traffic at the state’s many important ports and has disrupted maritime cargo operations. The Port of Oakland, CA, the second-largest container port in the world, had seen a 20 percent drop in shipping traffic entering the port within the first few weeks of the state’s virus outbreak in March. Unpredictable vessel schedules and reduced port capacity have maintained the declining rates. In May, the Port of Oakland announced that loaded import volume was down by 14.6 percent from May 2019 and loaded exports by 10.7 percent. The return of empty containers to Asia decreased 28 percent. Total cargo volume fell by 16.8 percent. 

Ground cargo transport has similarly experienced considerable delays and disruptions due to the temporary closure of the border between Mexico and the U.S. Though the closure does not apply to essential commerce or trade, including freight cargo trucks, enhanced sanitation and health protocols have strained efficiency and caused operational delays. This has been especially problematic for states like New Mexico, which send USD 1.5 billion in exports to Mexico each year.

More information about reopening measures in these states can be found in Appendix C.

Midwestern United States

All midwestern U.S. states are now experiencing increasing COVID-19 infections. 66 percent of the region had a decreasing trajectory of new cases until July 7, when the trend began reversing. Manufacturing is the region’s most visibly impacted industries, particularly in the states of Michigan, Kansas, Iowa, Nebraska, and North and South Dakota. Automotive original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) in Michigan and Illinois, and Tier-1 and sub-tier auto parts suppliers across the region were badly impacted with the introduction of business essentiality guidelines. Federally mandated critical infrastructure protections were issued for the industry, yet CDC-mandated compliance to prevent infection has proven challenging.

As of May 1, Illinois is allowing manufacturing operations, but employers are required to provide masks when employees are unable to maintain the six-foot minimum for social distancing. Indiana implemented its ‘Safe Return to Work for Indiana’s Manufacturing, Logistics, and Warehousing Sectors’ playbook on April 28. Manufacturing has been allowed to resume in full in Iowa as of May 18. Michigan’s manufacturing reopening guidance has been informed by CDC and OSHA regulations as of June 8. In Minnesota, manufacturing has resumed as of June 1, with requirements to develop and implement a preparedness plan. Manufacturers, as of May 16, have been requiring masks and social distancing to ensure business continuity in Missouri.

As of May 24, operational disruptions have been reported in manufacturing enterprises throughout Nebraska resulting from the general economic slowdown. The Ohio Department of Health specified on May 29 that manufacturers should adhere to social distancing, face covering, daily monitoring of symptoms, pattern shifting, regulating the number of people in common spaces, and isolating the workforce and facility to the maximum extent possible. As of April 21, the South Dakota Department of Health has a checklist available for manufacturing businesses to ensure occupational health and safety compliance. As of May 7, the Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation is permitting the resumption of production within the realm of occupational safety. 

More information about reopening measures in these states can be found in Appendix D.

Outlook and Recommendations

The recent spike in U.S. COVID-19 cases, concentrated in the southern and western states, jeopardizes the national recovery process. While states aim for the safest reopening and continuation of business operations, the inevitable uptick in cases risks prolonging the pandemic and further disrupting supply chain operations. It is imperative that states abide by CDC and OSHA health and safety standards when reopening to minimize the risk of new levels of contagion. While these regulations require reduced capacity, enhanced medical screenings, staggered employee shifts, and other operational inconveniences, the alternative of regression into a complete lockdown will have amplified consequences for the manufacturing and logistics industries. 

COVID-19 has a localized epidemiological nature which requires a wide variety of regulatory approaches by state governments. Supply chain managers with manufacturing or transportation operations in the United States are advised to consider the following recommendations: 

  • Factor regional case trends into supply chain risk mitigation strategies: When COVID-19 cases increase in the vicinity of a supplier, the potential for safety or regulatory shutdowns increases as well. The possibility of spikes in COVID-19 cases in specific regions, states, and even counties can be anticipated with site-level monitoring of public health data. By factoring local case trends into sourcing strategies and utilizing suppliers in alternative locations, supply chain managers can reduce the risk of production schedules being interrupted. 
  • Assess site-level safety measures: Due to the localized nature of public health circumstances and regulation in the United States, required safety measures, enforcement, and compliance may vary at the state and local level. Supply chain managers should verify that critical suppliers have secured sufficient personal protective equipment (PPE) for employees and are implementing safety protocols to international standards. 
  • Verify that regulatory burdens are not impeding carrier performance: As each state implements unique restrictions on matters such as rest stop closures and quarantine measures, carriers may struggle to ensure compliant, on-time performance. While measures affecting transportation have reduced over time, the regulatory landscape remains dynamic. Transportation managers should contact carriers and evaluate their preparedness for regulatory compliance along their route. 

Appendix

StateCurrent business restrictionsPrevious business restrictionsBusiness restrictions implemented Business restrictions lifted Number of cases (as of 07/21/2020)
AlabamaCurrent restrictions allow limited operations of restaurants, hair and nail salons, and gyms. Mask requirement in effect through July 31.Restrictions were placed on non-essential businesses. All businesses deemed as essential were exempt including manufacturing facilities.4/4/206/8/2068,891
ArkansasPhase 2 restrictions increased capacity for venues, restaurants, gyms, and other businesses. Reopening is on hold as cases increase.Restrictions were placed on non-essential businesses. All businesses deemed as essential were exempt including manufacturers and construction companies.3/16/205/18/2033,927
DelawareSome restrictions remain in place for the retail and cosmetology sectors. Phase 3 delayed as of June 25.Restrictions were placed on non-essential businesses. All businesses deemed as essential were exempt including broad exceptions for manufacturers.3/24/206/1/2013,624
FloridaCapacity restrictions have been placed on bars, beaches, and outdoor recreation and vary by county.Restrictions were placed on non-essential businesses. All businesses deemed as essential were exempt.3/20/204/30/20360,000
GeorgiaAll non-essential businesses are permitted to reopen with reduced capacity.Restrictions were placed on non-essential businesses. All businesses deemed as essential were exempt. Companies that continue in-person operations are required to implement mitigation efforts, including telework, sanitization, and optional health screenings including temperature checks for employees.4/3/206/12/20133,000
KentuckyAll non-essential businesses are permitted to reopen with reduced capacity.Restrictions were placed on non-essential businesses. All businesses deemed as essential were exempt including manufacturing, distribution, and supply chain for critical products and industries.3/23/205/22/2023,978
LouisianaRetail and restaurants may operate with 50 percent capacity. Phase 3 postponed since June 22.Restrictions were placed on non-essential businesses. All businesses deemed as essential were exempt.3/23/207/20/2095,002
MarylandNon-essential businesses are reopened with restrictions on capacity.Restrictions were placed on non-essential businesses. All businesses deemed as essential were exempt.3/30/206/12/2079,251
MississippiAll businesses are permitted to reopen with restrictions on capacity. Reopening paused since July 1.Restrictions were placed on non-essential businesses. All businesses deemed as essential were exempt.4/3/206/1/2043,889
North CarolinaRestrictions remain in place for the retail and entertainment sectorsRestrictions were placed on non-essential businesses. All businesses deemed as essential were exempt. Restrictions incorporates the federal CISA guidelines adds additional language for “Manufacture, distribution and supply chain for critical products and industries”.3/30/207/17/20101,000
OklahomaUnder Phase 3 of reopening, businesses can resume at full capacity.Some restrictions were placed on non-essential businesses. All businesses deemed as essential were exempt.4/3/206/1/2025,433
South CarolinaNearly all restrictions on non-essential businesses have been lifted.Some restrictions were placed on non-essential businesses. All businesses deemed as essential were exempt including individuals operating commercial vehicles transporting essential goods and products; individuals employed by airlines, and individuals otherwise engaged in commercial transportation activities.4/7/206/12/2071,445
TennesseeRestrictions remain in place for cosmetology and restaurants.Some restrictions were placed on non-essential businesses. All businesses deemed as essential were exempt including manufacturing, distribution and supply chain for critical products and industries.4/2/208/29/2077,944
TexasRestrictions have been placed on retail and outdoor recreation. Reopening paused as of June 25.Some restrictions were placed on non-essential businesses. All businesses deemed as essential were exempt.4/2/206/12/20346,000
VirginiaCapacity restrictions remain in place for many non-essential businesses, particularly for bars and restaurants. Occupational health and safety requirements mandated statewide.Some restrictions were placed on non-essential businesses. All businesses deemed as essential were exempt.3/30/207/1/2078,375
West VirginiaSome restrictions remain in place for restaurants.Some restrictions were placed on non-essential businesses. All businesses deemed as essential were exempt including manufacturers, distribution, and supply chain for critical products and industries.3/24/206/5/205,142
Appendix A: Reopening Measures in Southern United States
StateCurrent business restrictionsPrevious business restrictionsBusiness restrictions implemented Business restrictions lifted Number of cases (as of 07/21/2020)
MaineNoneAll non-essential businesses halted. All commercial trucking, manufacturing and corresponding supply-chains exempt.(NA – no direct impact)5/1/203,711
New HampshireNoneAll non-essential businesses halted. All commercial trucking, manufacturing and corresponding supply-chains exempt.(NA – no direct impact) 5/31/206,249
VermontManufacturing permitted with strong safety regulations that may impact capacity. Logistics not affected. 14-day quarantine for most non-commercial arrivals.Non-essential business operations (including some manufacturing and associated logistics) were ordered to halt.3/25/205/11/201,360
Massachusetts14-day quarantine on arrival except for regional arrivals or business travelers associated with federally designated critical infrastructure (may impact non-critical trucking).All non-essential business operations (including some manufacturing) were ordered to halt.3/23/205/18/20114,000
Rhode IslandManufacturing and logistics permitted to continue with safety measures.Manufacturing and logistics permitted to continue with safety measures. (NA – no direct impact) N/A17,904
ConnecticutFederally designated critical infrastructure workers, including truckers exempt from 14-day quarantine on arrival for numerous states. Phase 3 postponed.All non-essential businesses halted. All commercial trucking, manufacturing and corresponding supply-chains exempt.(NA – no direct impact)  5/20/2048,055
New YorkEssential workers, including manufacturing and truckers exempt from all restrictions including 14-day quarantine on arrival for numerous states.Regional, case-dependent phased restrictions including halted manufacturing.3/21/205/15/20412,000
New JerseyVoluntary 14-day quarantine on arrival for numerous states. Exemptions for federally designated critical infrastructure workers, business travel, and logistics. Reopening on pause.Gradual increase in manufacturing restrictions beginning March 16, but manufacturing and logistics were not halted.3/16/20N/A179,000
PennsylvaniaSpecial COVID-19 precautionary measures required on-site.All “non-life-sustaining” business operations (including some manufacturing) were ordered to halt. Logistics was not interrupted. A regionalized phased reopening was implemented.3/21/205/8/20 – 6/4/20106,000
Appendix B: Reopening Measures in Northeastern United States
StateCurrent business restrictionsPrevious business restrictionsBusiness restrictions implemented Business restrictions lifted Number of cases (as of 07/21/2020)
AlaskaPhase 3 being implemented: no mask mandate, no limits on group size, and no social distancing requirements. Businesses operating at 100 percent capacity.Shelter in place, intrastate travel ban, all businesses apart from essential closed.3/28/204/24/202,412
ArizonaBusinesses must prove COVID-19 compliance with physical distancing and enhanced sanitation measures before reopening. Reopening paused for 1 month.Stay-at-home order apart from essential businesses and services.3/31/205/15/20145,000 
ColoradoCities and counties meeting certain criteria can reopen later in JulyStay-at-home order apart from essential business3/26/204/26/2040,649
CaliforniaCounty-specific designations based on community spread. Some retail, manufacturing and logistics businesses can resume limited operations statewide if they can comply with state guidelines. Similarly, those counties with upward trends must close non-essential businesses.Stay-at-home order 3/19/205/12/20400,000
HawaiiCurrently in Phase 2 of reopening out of four phases. Businesses can resume operations with adherence to protocol. Out-of-state visitor quarantine extended through August.Statewide stay-at-home order, and essential activities and businesses only, interisland travel restrictions 3/25/205/5/201,371
IdahoPhase 4 in place —100 percent of businesses can operate in line with safety protocols. Will remain in this phase through at least July 23.Statewide stay-at-home order, intrastate travel limited, social distancing requirements3/25/205/1/2015,380
MontanaThe stay-at-home order expired for businesses on April 27. All businesses can operate in line with social distancing and sanitation guidelines at 75 percent capacity. Counties with 4+ active cases required to wear masks.Statewide stay-at-home order3/28/204/24/202,640
NevadaPhase 2 – businesses can operate at 50 percent capacity with sanitation guidelines; Phase 3 on hold and masks required.Statewide stay-at-home order3/31/205/15/2036,805
New MexicoBusinesses can operate with capacity and sanitation restrictions. The state’s emergency public health order was extended through July 15, and the next phase of reopening is extended indefinitely.Statewide stay-at-home order requiring nonessential businesses to close and 100 percent of the nonessential workforce to work from home. 3/23/205/16/2017,215
OregonCounty-specific restrictions – businesses can operate with limitations depending on what phase the county is in. Phase 3 not anticipated until December, and masks required at gatherings of 10+ people.Indefinite statewide stay-at-home directive, not order, urging people to remain home as much as possible3/23/205/7/2014,993
UtahMost of the state remains in the yellow phase, in which there are no economic activities that are categorically prohibited if common-sense precautions are in place.“Stay safe, stay home” directive, not mandate, urging people to remain home as much as possible3/27/204/17/2034,526
WashingtonLimited in-store retail and manufacturing operations resumed effective May 12, in line with industry-specific guidance. Reopening paused.An order was issued that required everyone to stay home unless they needed to pursue an essential activity. All non-essential businesses were closed3/23/206/1/2049,949
WyomingRestrictions on businesses have been eased, with relatively lenient distancing guidelines. Extant restrictions in place through July 31.No statewide stay-at-home order was issued, but a plea to stay home was issued.3/25/205/15/202,187
Appendix C: Reopening Measures in Western United States
StateCurrent business restrictionsPrevious business restrictionsBusiness restrictions implementedBusiness restrictions liftedNumber of cases (as of 07/16/2020)
IllinoisIllinois is currently in the 4th of a 5 Phase reopening plan as of June 26. Nearly all businesses are open in this phase, as operational guidelines for manufacturing were issued in Phase 3, gathering can include up to 50 people.All non-essential business halted.3/21/205/30/20164,000
IndianaIndiana is currently in Phase 4 of a 5 Phase reopening plan from July 4 to 17, with Elkhart County remaining in Phase 4 through July 31. Amusement facilities and personal services remain the only businesses with restrictions continuing. All non-essential businesses halted, and gatherings limited to 10 people. 3/25/205/1/2058,607
IowaBusinesses can operate as normal while in compliance with occupational safety guidelines.Non-essential businesses were limited in their activities in 77 of the state’s 99 counties.N/AN/A39,343
KansasKansas is currently in Phase 3 of a 4 Phase plan as of June 8. Gatherings of 15+ people are not recommended, and several retail and recreational establishments are advised to remain closed. Non-essential businesses were to be limited. 3/30/205/3/2023,544
MichiganAll manufacturing is underway as of May 18, some close-contact businesses remain halted. Return to Phase 3. Suspension of all businesses and services deemed “not necessary to sustain life”. 3/24/206/5/2082,486
MinnesotaOnly restrictions at present are on non-essential retail with social distancing and limited capacity requirements. Non-critical businesses were to be closed. 3/25/205/4/2047,147
MissouriIn accordance with the state’s 2-Phase reopening plan, Missouri has been considered fully reopened as of June 16, with neither statewide health order nor restrictions, with such restrictions at the discretion of local governments. Non-essential businesses were to be closed.4/6/205/3/2036,048       
Nebraska89 of Nebraska’s 93 counties are in Phase 3 of a 4-Phase plan as of June 22, with Dakota, Hall, Hamilton, and Merrick Counties in Phase 2 as of that same date. The Phase 3 counties allow 50-75 percent capacities in spaces, whereas the Phase 2 counties allow a maximum of 25 people or 25 percent occupancy.N/AN/AN/A22,847
North DakotaOnly restriction on businesses includes a 75 percent maximum occupancy. Non-essential businesses were to be closed.3/19/204/30/205,130
South DakotaNo order issued, only distancing recommendations in line with those of the CDC. No order issued, only distancing recommendations in line with those of the CDCN/AN/A7,943
OhioBased on the Level 1-4 system, with a higher number indicating greater severity of COVID-19 incidence, those in higher level counties may face more active health and safety requirements.Non-essential businesses to close. 3/23/205/20/2076,168
WisconsinWisconsin Supreme Court rescission of gubernatorial lockdown order on May 13 delegates non-essential business restrictions to the local level.Non-essential businesses to close.3/25/205/26/2046,754
Appendix D: Reopening Measures in Midwestern United States

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